Discussion:
Who doesn't want to work for $2000/year?
(too old to reply)
seasoned_geek
2016-12-28 15:40:12 UTC
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Ya gotta love this job posting:

https://www.indeed.com/viewjob?jk=5bf487d23d58432c&q=vax+cobol&tk=1b529n7n618h8e6f&from=ja&alid=573d33fee4b0f90143fe2b7e&utm_source=jobseeker_emails&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=job_alerts

In case it goes away, here is the funny part:

====

Job Type: Full-time

Salary: $2,000.00 /year

Job Location:

New York, NY

Required education:

Doctorate

Required experience:

Malbolge: 9 years

Required languages:

Russian
French
Dutch

Required license or certification:

Pilot's License

====

The pilot's license requirement begs the question, "Is the ability to flee the country the unspoken job requirement?"
IanD
2016-12-28 16:59:22 UTC
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Post by seasoned_geek
https://www.indeed.com/viewjob?jk=5bf487d23d58432c&q=vax+cobol&tk=1b529n7n618h8e6f&from=ja&alid=573d33fee4b0f90143fe2b7e&utm_source=jobseeker_emails&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=job_alerts
====
Job Type: Full-time
Salary: $2,000.00 /year
New York, NY
Doctorate
Malbolge: 9 years
Russian
French
Dutch
Pilot's License
====
The pilot's license requirement begs the question, "Is the ability to flee the country the unspoken job requirement?"
What's sad is there will be some folks desperate enough to apply !

I wonder who's good enough to master Malbolge. I'm sure there will be some folk who will add it to their resume so as to be 'qualified' to apply...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malbolge
Bill Gunshannon
2016-12-28 18:07:40 UTC
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Post by IanD
Post by seasoned_geek
https://www.indeed.com/viewjob?jk=5bf487d23d58432c&q=vax+cobol&tk=1b529n7n618h8e6f&from=ja&alid=573d33fee4b0f90143fe2b7e&utm_source=jobseeker_emails&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=job_alerts
====
Job Type: Full-time
Salary: $2,000.00 /year
New York, NY
Doctorate
Malbolge: 9 years
Russian
French
Dutch
Pilot's License
====
The pilot's license requirement begs the question, "Is the ability to flee the country the unspoken job requirement?"
What's sad is there will be some folks desperate enough to apply !
I wonder who's good enough to master Malbolge. I'm sure there will be some folk who will add it to their resume so as to be 'qualified' to apply...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malbolge
More importantly, is there a version for VMS and could VMS be
rewritten in it to eliminate all the C code?

bill
Bob Koehler
2016-12-29 14:24:12 UTC
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Post by seasoned_geek
https://www.indeed.com/viewjob?jk=5bf487d23d58432c&q=vax+cobol&tk=1b529n7n618h8e6f&from=ja&alid=573d33fee4b0f90143fe2b7e&utm_source=jobseeker_emails&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=job_alerts
Written to weed out applications via bot?
David Froble
2016-12-28 20:11:42 UTC
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Post by seasoned_geek
https://www.indeed.com/viewjob?jk=5bf487d23d58432c&q=vax+cobol&tk=1b529n7n618h8e6f&from=ja&alid=573d33fee4b0f90143fe2b7e&utm_source=jobseeker_emails&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=job_alerts
====
Job Type: Full-time
Salary: $2,000.00 /year
New York, NY
Doctorate
Malbolge: 9 years
Russian
French
Dutch
Pilot's License
====
The pilot's license requirement begs the question, "Is the ability to flee the country the unspoken job requirement?"
Why?

A license makes you legal. If you're already illegal, who needs a license?
Hein RMS van den Heuvel
2016-12-29 15:40:06 UTC
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Post by seasoned_geek
https://www.indeed.com/viewjob?jk=5bf487d23d58432c&q=vax+cobol&tk=1b529n7n618h8e6f&from=ja&alid=573d33fee4b0f90143fe2b7e&utm_source=jobseeker_emails&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=job_alerts
Actually, I think the Malboge is the funny part, and possibly the implication that VAX, Clusters, and Dutch are in similar realms.

Look up Malbolge on Wikipedia. It's fun (for geeks and greeks)
Highlights, ternary value, 3**10 memoty locations, self modifying, CRaZy operator.
"Hello World!" may be: (=<`#9]~6ZY32Vx/4Rs+0No-&Jk)"Fh}|Bcy?`=*z]Kw%oG4UUS0/@-ejc(:'8dc

I can do the Dutch, French and VAX parts of the job.

Indeed, it may be a honeypot of sorts, or just a great Joke.

Hein
V***@SendSpamHere.ORG
2016-12-29 15:44:30 UTC
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Post by Hein RMS van den Heuvel
Post by seasoned_geek
https://www.indeed.com/viewjob?jk=5bf487d23d58432c&q=vax+cobol&tk=1b529n7n618h8e6f&from=ja&alid=573d33fee4b0f90143fe2b7e&utm_source=jobseeker_emails&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=job_alerts
Actually, I think the Malboge is the funny part, and possibly the implication that VAX, Clusters, and Dutch are in similar realms.
Look up Malbolge on Wikipedia. It's fun (for geeks and greeks)
Highlights, ternary value, 3**10 memoty locations, self modifying, CRaZy operator.
I can do the Dutch, French and VAX parts of the job.
Indeed, it may be a honeypot of sorts, or just a great Joke.
Hein
I think the whole job posting is just a geek joke.
--
VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)ORG

I speak to machines with the voice of humanity.
seasoned_geek
2016-12-29 17:24:45 UTC
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Post by V***@SendSpamHere.ORG
Post by Hein RMS van den Heuvel
Post by seasoned_geek
https://www.indeed.com/viewjob?jk=5bf487d23d58432c&q=vax+cobol&tk=1b529n7n618h8e6f&from=ja&alid=573d33fee4b0f90143fe2b7e&utm_source=jobseeker_emails&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=job_alerts
Actually, I think the Malboge is the funny part, and possibly the implication that VAX, Clusters, and Dutch are in similar realms.
Look up Malbolge on Wikipedia. It's fun (for geeks and greeks)
Highlights, ternary value, 3**10 memoty locations, self modifying, CRaZy operator.
I can do the Dutch, French and VAX parts of the job.
Indeed, it may be a honeypot of sorts, or just a great Joke.
Hein
I think the whole job posting is just a geek joke.
--
VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)ORG
I speak to machines with the voice of humanity.
Part of me is beginning to believe the job is real and they were posting a daily rate on a site which only allowed annual values.

The other part of me knows there are programmers in former Soviet Block countries who are actually paid far less than that per year.
Paul Sture
2016-12-29 22:28:33 UTC
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Post by seasoned_geek
Post by V***@SendSpamHere.ORG
I think the whole job posting is just a geek joke.
Part of me is beginning to believe the job is real and they were
posting a daily rate on a site which only allowed annual values.
The other part of me knows there are programmers in former Soviet
Block countries who are actually paid far less than that per year.
If you offer an expenses-paid package such that they can save all
that salary in hard currency, it could be quite attractive to some.
--
"History does not repeat itself, but it does rhyme" -- Mark Twain
Simon Clubley
2016-12-29 19:09:01 UTC
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Post by Hein RMS van den Heuvel
Post by seasoned_geek
https://www.indeed.com/viewjob?jk=5bf487d23d58432c&q=vax+cobol&tk=1b529n7n618h8e6f&from=ja&alid=573d33fee4b0f90143fe2b7e&utm_source=jobseeker_emails&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=job_alerts
Actually, I think the Malboge is the funny part, and possibly the implication that VAX, Clusters, and Dutch are in similar realms.
The first sentence in the advert made me think the poster might have
been around Tooting in the late 1970s... :-)
Post by Hein RMS van den Heuvel
Look up Malbolge on Wikipedia. It's fun (for geeks and greeks)
Highlights, ternary value, 3**10 memoty locations, self modifying, CRaZy operator.
Well, we now know what DEC programming language inspired the above
syntax. :-)
Post by Hein RMS van den Heuvel
I can do the Dutch, French and VAX parts of the job.
Indeed, it may be a honeypot of sorts, or just a great Joke.
It's a joke (I hope). Did you see the "Interwebs" reference ?

Simon.
--
Simon Clubley, ***@remove_me.eisner.decus.org-Earth.UFP
Microsoft: Bringing you 1980s technology to a 21st century world
Paul Sture
2016-12-29 22:23:02 UTC
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Post by Simon Clubley
Post by Hein RMS van den Heuvel
Post by seasoned_geek
https://www.indeed.com/viewjob?jk=5bf487d23d58432c&q=vax+cobol&tk=1b529n7n618h8e6f&from=ja&alid=573d33fee4b0f90143fe2b7e&utm_source=jobseeker_emails&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=job_alerts
Actually, I think the Malboge is the funny part, and possibly the implication that VAX, Clusters, and Dutch are in similar realms.
The first sentence in the advert made me think the poster might have
been around Tooting in the late 1970s... :-)
For those who don't get the reference to Tooting:

<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citizen_Smith>

I recall the series as being a bit dire but with only 3 channels back then
we didn't have much choice.
Post by Simon Clubley
Post by Hein RMS van den Heuvel
Look up Malbolge on Wikipedia. It's fun (for geeks and greeks)
Highlights, ternary value, 3**10 memoty locations, self modifying, CRaZy operator.
Well, we now know what DEC programming language inspired the above
syntax. :-)
Post by Hein RMS van den Heuvel
I can do the Dutch, French and VAX parts of the job.
Indeed, it may be a honeypot of sorts, or just a great Joke.
It's a joke (I hope). Did you see the "Interwebs" reference ?
Also the not-quite-native-English in:

"We're looking for candidates who are masterful in using a variety of
languages and coding abilities who are looking to experiment and grow.
Must have great persistence and perseverance. You will be working
closely with our team and must be dynamic, excited, and motivated."
--
"History does not repeat itself, but it does rhyme" -- Mark Twain
Simon Clubley
2016-12-31 20:33:08 UTC
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Post by Paul Sture
Post by Simon Clubley
The first sentence in the advert made me think the poster might have
been around Tooting in the late 1970s... :-)
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citizen_Smith>
I recall the series as being a bit dire but with only 3 channels back then
we didn't have much choice.
Aye, when I were a lad, we had just three channels and learned to
like them. :-)

We also had to get up and walk _both_ _ways_ to change the channel... :-)

(BTW, my recollection of the series is the same as yours but even the
lousy programmes sometimes have quotes that get stuck in your memory.)
Post by Paul Sture
Post by Simon Clubley
It's a joke (I hope). Did you see the "Interwebs" reference ?
"We're looking for candidates who are masterful in using a variety of
languages and coding abilities who are looking to experiment and grow.
Must have great persistence and perseverance. You will be working
closely with our team and must be dynamic, excited, and motivated."
Also known as management speak. :-)

More seriously, it would actually be interesting to know who advertised
this job and why. I wonder if in a couple of months time an article
will appear somewhere analysing the submitted CVs and comparing them to
some, hmm, "creative" CVs submitted for real jobs.

Simon.
--
Simon Clubley, ***@remove_me.eisner.decus.org-Earth.UFP
Microsoft: Bringing you 1980s technology to a 21st century world
Paul Sture
2017-01-11 14:40:23 UTC
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Post by Simon Clubley
Post by Paul Sture
Post by Simon Clubley
The first sentence in the advert made me think the poster might have
been around Tooting in the late 1970s... :-)
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citizen_Smith>
I recall the series as being a bit dire but with only 3 channels back then
we didn't have much choice.
Aye, when I were a lad, we had just three channels and learned to
like them. :-)
We also had to get up and walk _both_ _ways_ to change the channel... :-)
I'd best be careful here going down the 4 Yorkshiremen route, because
in the early 60s we had a remote control telly. It was a Phillips,
with mute and channel change functions activated by a strong torch.

The channel changer was a noisy affair. I think it must have been
a solenoid firing repeatedly against some kind of ratchet.
Post by Simon Clubley
(BTW, my recollection of the series is the same as yours but even the
lousy programmes sometimes have quotes that get stuck in your memory.)
Post by Paul Sture
Post by Simon Clubley
It's a joke (I hope). Did you see the "Interwebs" reference ?
"We're looking for candidates who are masterful in using a variety of
languages and coding abilities who are looking to experiment and grow.
Must have great persistence and perseverance. You will be working
closely with our team and must be dynamic, excited, and motivated."
Also known as management speak. :-)
More seriously, it would actually be interesting to know who advertised
this job and why. I wonder if in a couple of months time an article
will appear somewhere analysing the submitted CVs and comparing them to
some, hmm, "creative" CVs submitted for real jobs.
The VAX model numbers were, I suspect, deliberately wrong. The MicroVAX
2000 didn't have Qbus capability, and the VAX 4300 was actually a VAX
4000 Model 300, or 4000-300 (known as both?).

You learn something every day though:

<http://www.obsolyte.com/dec/>

It is very useful to have a VS2000 around, if only to format hard
disks with. For a MFM hard disk to work in a MicroVAX it must have a
very peculiar format written to it. The VS2000 and the Q-bus RQDX3
controller for the MicroVAX II et al require this format to be
present.

The VS2000 is the only DEC device that can write this format without
expensive, hard-to-get software: the formatter is present in the
VS2000 ROM under the TEST 70 command.

If the formatting of a disk you are using on a RQDX controller is
damaged, you can format the disk in a VS2000 and hook it back up to
the RQDX controller, the disk will work like new.

Looks like a revenue opportunity I knew nothing about back in the day
when I had a VAXstation 2000. I do recall one DEC engineer grousing
about how hard to get at the disk was, so perhaps it wasn't as easy
as the article makes it sound.
--
A supercomputer is a device for turning compute-bound problems into
I/O-bound problems. ---Ken Batcher
--
A supercomputer is a device for turning compute-bound problems into
I/O-bound problems. ---Ken Batcher
t***@glaver.org
2017-01-11 22:18:30 UTC
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Post by Paul Sture
I'd best be careful here going down the 4 Yorkshiremen route, because
in the early 60s we had a remote control telly. It was a Phillips,
with mute and channel change functions activated by a strong torch.
The channel changer was a noisy affair. I think it must have been
a solenoid firing repeatedly against some kind of ratchet.
I forget the brand, but there was also a sound-based remote control - pressing a button struck a metal spring that vibrated at a specific pitch. I don't recall if it did anything other than "channel up".

The tuner itself is pretty noisy when changing channels, as it was a barrel of parts with detent stops for each channel. Usually you're changing channels manually, so you don't notice the noise and you reduce the applied force when you feel the tuner beginning to drop into a detent.
Post by Paul Sture
The VS2000 is the only DEC device that can write this format without
expensive, hard-to-get software: the formatter is present in the
VS2000 ROM under the TEST 70 command.
Not true. The "Micro-11 Formatter" P/N BL-FN7AG-MC was a floppy sold by DEC for $11. On it was program ZRQC0 which formatted disks on an RQDX3 (ZRQB0 was for the RQDX1/2, aka "mud board"). There were some arcane values required if using a non-DEC-equivalent drive, but that applied to the VS2000 as well. The VAX equivalent was included on the MDM (MicroVAX Diagnostic Monitor) P/N AQ-GM5AL-DN for TK50 (I forget the price).
Steven Schweda
2017-01-12 00:00:25 UTC
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Post by t***@glaver.org
Post by Paul Sture
The channel changer was a noisy affair. I think it must have been
a solenoid firing repeatedly against some kind of ratchet.
I forget the brand, but there was also a sound-based remote
control - pressing a button struck a metal spring that
vibrated at a specific pitch. I don't recall if it did
anything other than "channel up".
In the US, Zenith had "Space Command", which offered up to
four functions (On-Off-Volume (3 steps?), Mute, Channel Up,
Channel Down). Cheaper versions had fewer buttons/features
(delete Channel Down, Mute, ...). The buttons actuate small
hammers which excite aluminum rods to generate the ultrasonic
sounds. The (turret) tuner was driven by a geared-down
induction motor. Customer-settable cams on the turret could
be set to stop (for a desired channel) or skip (for an unused
or undesired channel). (I can't recall ever seeing any other
tuner mechanism.) Google can find many pictures.

Slow and noisy by modern standards, but better than
walking across the room. Color made the hammered-rod
obsolete. It would have been tough to make a fine adjustment
to the Hue control with this kind of scheme. Steps it could
do, but not continuous adjustments. After a mechanical
failure, I built an electronic remote (three-button -- cheap
TV) using a 555 timer and a transducer from a motion detector
(burglar alarm).
Post by t***@glaver.org
[...] The VAX equivalent was included on the MDM (MicroVAX
Diagnostic Monitor) P/N AQ-GM5AL-DN for TK50 (I forget the
price).
That'd be the "expensive" one. The (free with your
MicroVAX) "DIAG CUST" wouldn't do a virgin/corrupted drive,
only the (pricey) "DIAG MAINT". (I borrowed one from a
helpful DEC service guy, who made sure that I made a copy
before I returned it.)
Steven Schweda
2017-01-12 05:17:59 UTC
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[...] It would have been tough to make a fine adjustment
to the Hue control with this kind of scheme. [...]
Hmmm. Judging from some of those pictures (of the "600"
model), they actually did that, though. As I recall, the
volume adjustment used a type of stepper relay (with three
steps?). I have no idea what they did for the Hue
adjustment. The picture suggests that Mute was used as a
mode bit, so that Channel Lower/Higher did Hue Red/Green
when the sound was muted, but I never saw one of those in
real life. (So the "600" Commander was actually a relabeled
"400" Commander, but there was more stuff in the "600"
receiver.) As I recall, the Space Command receivers which I
saw used transistors, even when the main TV chassis still
used vacuum tubes.

Some clever engineering was done in the days before
thousands of transistors could be thrown at any problem (at
negligible cost).
Simon Clubley
2017-01-12 00:18:17 UTC
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Post by Paul Sture
Post by Simon Clubley
Aye, when I were a lad, we had just three channels and learned to
like them. :-)
We also had to get up and walk _both_ _ways_ to change the channel... :-)
I'd best be careful here going down the 4 Yorkshiremen route, because
in the early 60s we had a remote control telly. It was a Phillips,
with mute and channel change functions activated by a strong torch.
Interesting. In the early 1960s I wasn't yet born so I never came
across them.
Post by Paul Sture
The channel changer was a noisy affair. I think it must have been
a solenoid firing repeatedly against some kind of ratchet.
The first remote control I remember was an infra-red one from the
very early 1980s.

I learnt something new today, thanks.

Simon.
--
Simon Clubley, ***@remove_me.eisner.decus.org-Earth.UFP
Microsoft: Bringing you 1980s technology to a 21st century world
Bill Gunshannon
2017-01-12 02:27:22 UTC
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Post by Simon Clubley
Post by Paul Sture
Post by Simon Clubley
Aye, when I were a lad, we had just three channels and learned to
like them. :-)
We also had to get up and walk _both_ _ways_ to change the channel... :-)
I'd best be careful here going down the 4 Yorkshiremen route, because
in the early 60s we had a remote control telly. It was a Phillips,
with mute and channel change functions activated by a strong torch.
Interesting. In the early 1960s I wasn't yet born so I never came
across them.
Post by Paul Sture
The channel changer was a noisy affair. I think it must have been
a solenoid firing repeatedly against some kind of ratchet.
The first remote control I remember was an infra-red one from the
very early 1980s.
I learnt something new today, thanks.
Although I have never seen them in the US when I was stationed
with the Brits in Northern Germany I had a telly leased from the
NAFI. It had an ultrasonic remote control. Only one minor problem
with that concept. Thin walls between the quarters. It took me a
while unntil I figured out why the channel would suddenly change
apparently on its own.

bill
Bob Koehler
2017-01-12 14:34:32 UTC
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Post by Simon Clubley
The first remote control I remember was an infra-red one from the
very early 1980s.
The first remote control that I remember was me and my brother.
Michael Moroney
2017-01-12 15:20:03 UTC
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Post by Bob Koehler
Post by Simon Clubley
The first remote control I remember was an infra-red one from the
very early 1980s.
The first remote control that I remember was me and my brother.
Archie Bunker on the TV show "All in the Family" had a TV remote of
some sort. That was the first I heard of such a thing.

seasoned_geek
2016-12-29 17:29:45 UTC
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Oh, btw, if you were looking to create encrypted financial transactions Malbolge and some of the other languages listed on the wiki page would be ideal, provided nobody knew you used it. Imagine all of those hackers and crackers trying to decipher base-3 encryption when most of their code will be expecting ordinary 256 to 1024-bit binary encryption.

The requirement of a pilot's license is still the oddly troubling part. Makes one believe this is for Dark Web transactions where one may need to escape whatever country they are in at a moment's notice.
Steven Schweda
2016-12-30 05:59:24 UTC
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[...] Q-bus MicroVAX 2000 [...]
But I'm easily amused.
Stephen Hoffman
2017-01-01 00:53:20 UTC
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https://www.indeed.com/viewjob?jk=...
Seems a Dantean job-posting equivalent of a canary trap — intended to
identify folks that search for specific strings and/or to identify
folks that pass around links to postings — or of some guerrilla
marketing for the job-posting site itself. Or both.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canary_trap
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guerrilla_marketing
--
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