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What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
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Simon Clubley
2021-03-03 18:24:22 UTC
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What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?

For me, I started with a PDP-11 running RSTS/E V9.{something early},
then onto VAX/VMS V5.{something} and then onto Alpha VMS V6.{something}.

I have not touched any Itanium systems.

Simon.
--
Simon Clubley, ***@remove_me.eisner.decus.org-Earth.UFP
Walking destinations on a map are further away than they appear.
Arne Vajhøj
2021-03-03 18:26:44 UTC
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Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
Briefly 4.something on a VAX 8600.

It got upgraded to 4.4 on a VAX 8650 after a short time.

Arne
abrsvc
2021-03-03 18:27:48 UTC
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Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
For me, I started with a PDP-11 running RSTS/E V9.{something early},
then onto VAX/VMS V5.{something} and then onto Alpha VMS V6.{something}.
I have not touched any Itanium systems.
Simon.
--
Walking destinations on a map are further away than they appear.
RT-11 in 1979, moving to VAX/VMS also in 1979 (V1).

Alpha pre-release versions (working at DEC at the time).
Tad Winters
2021-03-03 19:00:46 UTC
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Post by abrsvc
Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
For me, I started with a PDP-11 running RSTS/E V9.{something early},
then onto VAX/VMS V5.{something} and then onto Alpha VMS V6.{something}.
I have not touched any Itanium systems.
Simon.
--
Walking destinations on a map are further away than they appear.
RT-11 in 1979, moving to VAX/VMS also in 1979 (V1).
Alpha pre-release versions (working at DEC at the time).
VAX/VMS V4.6 on a cluster of two VAX 8530 and one VAX 8250, and upgraded
to V5.0
VAX 11/730 with VAX/VMS V4.4
MicroVMS 4.7 on something
Customer systems included:
VAX 11/750
MicroVAX II
Some PDP machines, running TSX-Plus and some other multiuser OS
Lots of MicroVAX 3100 series, running VMS V5.2 through V5.5-2Hx
Some smaller, early AlphaServer
AlphaServer 1000A/233 with OpenVMS V6.1
AlphaServer 1000A/266
AlphaServer 1200
AlphaServer DS10
AlphaServer DS20
AlphaServer ES40
These AlphaServers up through OpenVMS 7.3
VAX 4000-200
Two customer servers replaced with vtVAX, running OpenVMS V6.2 and
OpenVMS V7.1

Never Itanium.

I'm only aware of one customer still running VMS and it's on a vtVAX.
John Santos
2021-04-30 15:01:29 UTC
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In article <f14fe8ca-9d2a-4fb3-b834-
***@googlegroups.com>, ***@yahoo.com
says...
Post by abrsvc
Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
For me, I started with a PDP-11 running RSTS/E V9.{something early},
then onto VAX/VMS V5.{something} and then onto Alpha VMS V6.{something}.
I have not touched any Itanium systems.
Simon.
--
Walking destinations on a map are further away than they appear.
RT-11 in 1979, moving to VAX/VMS also in 1979 (V1).
Alpha pre-release versions (working at DEC at the time).
Did a PDP-1 have an operating system? Does the paper tape
loader count? If so, boot the paper tape loader tape,
then load the program tape (Space War, Moon Lander), and
go!

And it was free, at a time when Pong cost a buck to play!
--
John
Lee Gleason
2021-03-03 18:45:51 UTC
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Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
For me, I started with a PDP-11 running RSTS/E V9.{something early},
then onto VAX/VMS V5.{something} and then onto Alpha VMS V6.{something}.
I have not touched any Itanium systems.
Simon.
IAS 3.0 on a PDP-11/70 was my first DEC system.

--
Lee K. Gleason N5ZMR
Control-G Consultants
***@comcast.net
George Cornelius
2021-09-02 16:16:20 UTC
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Post by Lee Gleason
Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
For me, I started with a PDP-11 running RSTS/E V9.{something early},
then onto VAX/VMS V5.{something} and then onto Alpha VMS V6.{something}.
I have not touched any Itanium systems.
Simon.
IAS 3.0 on a PDP-11/70 was my first DEC system.
Hi, Lee,

I remember you from the RSX Sig Tapes! I was there too - at
least in a small way.

Yes, we tried to get IAS but were talked out of it. So my start
at that level was RSX11M 3.3 on a pair of 11/70's, soon upgrading
to 11M+ 4.0 .

Interesting that while the 11/70 was, performance-wise, a large
increase from the previous system, a clone of an IBM 1800, it had
a smaller address space (32K 16-bit words vs. 64K). Since we
were doing something new - raster graphics - in that address
space, we were always running up against that limit. M+ gave
us separate I&D space and supervisor mode libraries, and
RAM disk from DECUS (Stamerjohn, Everhart, Mitchell) gave us
fast overlays without the restrictions of the offically
supported PLAS-based memory resident overlays.

But my first DEC system was actually a PDP-8/I with two
DECtapes, a printer, high-speed paper tape, and a console
TTY. A whopping 4K 12-bit words of address space, with,
again, special games being played at the assembler language
level to access more.

Oh, and it ran Dibol, which was its own O/S (like Mumps
on the 11's). But I was also using OS/2, which I swear
was originally called PS/2. I would trot it out when
I wanted to run a real O/S!

Oh, and we started in the Playboy (a.k.a. Palmolive)
Building! After I was there a month, though, we moved
to the John Hancock nearby, 2nd tallest building in
the U.S.

George Cornelius
Post by Lee Gleason
--
Lee K. Gleason N5ZMR
Control-G Consultants
Chris Townley
2021-03-03 18:55:30 UTC
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Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
For me, I started with a PDP-11 running RSTS/E V9.{something early},
then onto VAX/VMS V5.{something} and then onto Alpha VMS V6.{something}.
I have not touched any Itanium systems.
Simon.
Started (as a user) on PDP 11/44 with RSTS v8. Then migrated to V9, then
onto VMS 4 on 8350 which I took over running.

Then onto centralised Vax4000, then Alpha.

Joined the dev team formally in '97 and gradually took over sole
development, with an Itanium port in 2007, Finally decommissioned the
system in 2013

Restarted hobbyist last year, after a break of a few years and looking
forward to X86 as well as Alpha (PSW plus FreeAXP oin Win10)

Chris
Daniel O'Reilly
2021-03-03 18:50:30 UTC
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Been around a while...

RSTS/E V5.2
RT-11 V2
IAS V2, IIRC
RSX-11M 3.1
RSX-11S 3.2
RSX-11M+ 1.0
VAX/VMS V1.0
TSD V1.0
TSX (yeah, I know it wasn't written by DEC but it booted via RT-11)
Ultrix 4.<something?>
Micro/RSX (whatever the first version was)
OS/8 (don't remember what version it was)
Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
For me, I started with a PDP-11 running RSTS/E V9.{something early},
then onto VAX/VMS V5.{something} and then onto Alpha VMS V6.{something}.
I have not touched any Itanium systems.
Simon.
chris
2021-03-03 19:40:52 UTC
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Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
For me, I started with a PDP-11 running RSTS/E V9.{something early},
then onto VAX/VMS V5.{something} and then onto Alpha VMS V6.{something}.
I have not touched any Itanium systems.
Simon.
RT11 in 1986/7, macro 11, V4 and V5, RSX/M amd M+ along the way, then
VMS in the early to mid nineties. Systems programming, Vax C and
a little assembler. Last VMS version used here was 5.4 and for the sort
of work done here, increasingly hard work.

Eventually gave up and settled on Sun 3 to start, then Sparc. Still
used today and to write this note.

Never touched Itanium either, no real desire to either,,,

Chris
Bill Gunshannon
2021-03-03 23:20:32 UTC
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Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
RT-11 in 1980-81.
VMS 1981-82
RSX 1985
RSTS 1988
Ultrix-11 199? (not sure when I first did it but I do remember
having to hack a boot tape from files on the
Internet.)


bill
Dave Froble
2021-03-03 20:11:45 UTC
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Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
For me, I started with a PDP-11 running RSTS/E V9.{something early},
then onto VAX/VMS V5.{something} and then onto Alpha VMS V6.{something}.
I have not touched any Itanium systems.
Simon.
My first exposure to DEC was on RSTS/E V4.5b, I think. Since the OS was
built/linked on the target system, using DEC's DOS OS, I'd guess that
DOS OS would be the earliest I'd used.
--
David Froble Tel: 724-529-0450
Dave Froble Enterprises, Inc. E-Mail: ***@tsoft-inc.com
DFE Ultralights, Inc.
170 Grimplin Road
Vanderbilt, PA 15486
David Jones
2021-03-03 20:22:30 UTC
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I used RSTS/E in high school, I don't know if that is an earlier OS than the RSX 11M I used
a couple years later in college.
Timothy Stark
2021-03-03 20:16:15 UTC
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I am starting earliest DEC operating systems in 1984 when I attended
university.

TOPS-10 702 on DECsystem10 1090 system
VAX/VMS 3.6 on VAX-11/780 system
Ultrix 2.4 on VAX-11/780 with Internet access

Last using with latest DEC operating system before my graduation.

TOPS-10 703 in 1988 before DECsystem10 retired and went to museum.
VAX/VMS 5.2 on VAX 8650 system before my gradution with BITNET access
Ultrix 2.4 on MicroVAX II and MicroVAX II/GPX

I can access my files through DECnet with all operating systems.

Later I started to use Internet on
Tim

-----Original Message-----
From: Info-vax <info-vax-***@rbnsn.com> On Behalf Of Simon Clubley via
Info-vax
Sent: Wednesday, March 3, 2021 1:24 PM
To: info-***@rbnsn.com
Cc: Simon Clubley <***@remove_me.eisner.decus.org-Earth.UFP>
Subject: [Info-vax] What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked
with ?

What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?

For me, I started with a PDP-11 running RSTS/E V9.{something early}, then
onto VAX/VMS V5.{something} and then onto Alpha VMS V6.{something}.

I have not touched any Itanium systems.

Simon.

--
Simon Clubley, ***@remove_me.eisner.decus.org-Earth.UFP
Walking destinations on a map are further away than they appear.
John Dallman
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
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Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
For me, I started with a PDP-11 running RSTS/E V9.{something early},
then onto VAX/VMS V5.{something} and then onto Alpha VMS
V6.{something}.
PDP-11/40 running RSTS/E in 1977-9 at the equivalent of high school. VMS
on VAX and Alpha in 1995-99. Quite a bit of UNIX on DEC hardware at other
times.

John
Bob
2021-03-03 21:25:22 UTC
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DOS-8 and PS-8 (later OS/8) on various PDP-8s in college. 1972

My first home computer was the Heathkit HT-11 running RT-11 V2 and V3

When I started working for DEC in 1980, I became the Version 4 person.
OS/8 was at 3D and never went farther, but that's where I started.
RT-11 when V4.0 was released
RSX-11 when V4.0 was released
VMS when V4.0 was released
John H. Reinhardt
2021-03-03 21:49:16 UTC
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Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
For me, I started with a PDP-11 running RSTS/E V9.{something early},
then onto VAX/VMS V5.{something} and then onto Alpha VMS V6.{something}.
I have not touched any Itanium systems.
Simon.
My first introduction to the DEC world was in the summer of 1977 at Camp Retupmoc at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. It was RSTS/E V06B on a PDP-11/70. A year later in 1978 I started my freshman year there and it had been upgraded to V06C. Later it was V7.0 and up to V7.2 (I think) by the time I left in 1983. In the meantime the VAX-11/780 arrived over summer break in 1980 and I was introduced to VAX/VMS V2.1 in the Fall of that year. Over the summer of 1981 Rose received several LSI-11 systems on a grant and I was introduced to RT-11, not sure which version. I still have two TU58 tape cartridges for booting RT11SJ. If I only had a TU58 tape drive. In 1998 I had a consulting job and met my first Alpha. It was an AlphaServer 2100 cluster with two systems and shared SCSI disks running OpenVMS V6.2

I have also run OpenVMS IA64 on personal RX2600's and an RZ2660. Looking forward to OpenVMS x86 later this year (hopefully)
--
John H. Reinhardt
Bob Eager
2021-03-03 22:18:59 UTC
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Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
For me, I started with a PDP-11 running RSTS/E V9.{something early},
then onto VAX/VMS V5.{something} and then onto Alpha VMS V6.{something}.
I have not touched any Itanium systems.
Simon.
DOS/BATCH (probably about V2) in 1973.
--
My posts are my copyright and if @diy_forums or Home Owners' Hub
wish to copy them they can pay me £1 a message.
Use the BIG mirror service in the UK: http://www.mirrorservice.org
*lightning surge protection* - a w_tom conductor
gah4
2021-03-03 22:26:04 UTC
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Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
TOPS-10 on a KA-10 in 1976, followed by VAX/VMS in 1979.
Crabs
2021-03-03 23:08:09 UTC
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Let see......got a TK50 backup tape somewhere around here.....
Ah! Here it is. *Wipes the dust and cobwebs off of a plastic cube*
RSX11M+ V3.0
Dated 4/12/86.
Came out of a PDP 11-73.
The backups for the PDP 11-23's that I used to have were on nine track tape reels, and I dumped them many many years ago.
I tickled the keys of a VT100 terminal attached to a PDP11-23 for the very first time in the summer of 1980.
Since then, it's been a blur of upgrades both software and hardware, from PDP/RSX to VAX/VMS ending with Alpha/OpenVMS.
Pretty much all flavors included there in.
I've never Itaniumed or VSI'd......and likely won't. Ever.
The Layered Product ("Software" to all the Windows Kiddies today) that I use on my Mass Spectrometers was never certified on anything newer than a DS10 running OpenVMS 8.4.

'Crabs
Roger Ivie
2021-03-04 02:40:43 UTC
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Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
I kinda came at things backwards. first DEC operating system I used was VAX/VMS
on an 11/780 in 1981. Then i got involved with some PDP-8/F and PDP-8/m systems
running ETOS. Then had a run-in with RSX-11 on a PDP-11/60 and RT-11 on some
sort of LSI-11, I think a PDP-11/23. After that, it was a VAX/VMS on an 11/730 as
well as on an 11/780 that I had all to myself, along with RT-11 on a variety of
PDP-11s. Got involved with Alpha/VMS before it was released, back when you had
to write device drivers in MACRO-32. Also had a bit of experience with Ultrix on
DECstations as well as OSF/1 on both Alphas and DECstations. Currently working
with VMS on Itanium.
--
roger ivie
***@gmail.com
geze...@rlgsc.com
2021-03-04 03:21:38 UTC
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All,

My first DEC system was a PDP-11/40 RSX-11D Version 6.x circa 1975.

Subsequently worked with RSX-11M/M-PLUS/S , P/OS, many of the VAX models, Alphas, Itaniums, and others.

OpenVMS (nee VAX/VMS since Version 1.0).

- Bob Gezelter, http://www.rlgsc.com
Henry Crun
2021-03-04 03:39:25 UTC
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Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
For me, I started with a PDP-11 running RSTS/E V9.{something early},
then onto VAX/VMS V5.{something} and then onto Alpha VMS V6.{something}.
I have not touched any Itanium systems.
Simon.
RSTS 6.<something> on a PDP 11/70
Four more-than-mansized cabinets, and two washing-machine-sized disks, 3-phase power
one mega memory, on a board that took two hands to pull out (just the memory.)
--
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QOTD: http://alpha.mike-r.com/qotd.php
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Missile address: N31.7624/E34.9691
IanD
2021-03-04 06:54:27 UTC
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VMS V4 something...too long ago to exactly remember, it was before clusters I think, on a VAX-11/785

Later on various VMS versions all the way up to 8.4 bla VSI on Itanium

The one's I can remember and some of these we had multiples of were...

VAX-11/730 (quickly mothballed but because of a stupid 10 year lease, retained in storage)
VAX-11/750
VAX-11/785
VAX 8600 - This one brings the fondest memory for some reason
VAXserver 3100
VAX 6250?
VAX 7800
AlphaServer 2100
Alpha 8400
DS10
DS20
ES40
ES80
GS1280
rx2800 i2 (VSI)
rx2800 i4 (VSI)

and now....no VMS at all (just linux and windows) :-(
Paul Hardy
2021-03-04 10:17:27 UTC
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Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
The earliest DEC machine that I used in 1973 had no operating system and no
disks - it was the PDP7 that had paper tape and a link to the Cambridge
Titan. It was ’fun’ programming it in Fortran on paper tape!

The first machine with an operating system in 1975 was a PDP15, again with
no disks, but had 2 DECtapes. The OS was KM15 Keyboard Monitor, then
Foreground/Background - two users! Programming in BCPL.

Next was PDP11/45 under RSX/11M in 1975. This had two RL05 10MB disks, and
about 5 users programming in Fortran and Macro-11.

Then VAX-11/780 under VMS 1.5 in 1979, and many other VAX and MicroVAX
models up to the 1990s.

Onward to Alpha AXP in 1993 on OpenVMS AXP 1.0, and through with other
Alphas to 2003.

Then I shifted away from VMS, only returning using SimH for industrial
archaeology more recently.

I’ve never touched an Itanium machine.
--
Paul at the paulhardy.net domain
Elliott Roper
2021-03-04 11:35:58 UTC
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On 3 Mar 2021 at 18:24:22 GMT, "Simon Clubley"
Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
For me, I started with a PDP-11 running RSTS/E V9.{something early},
then onto VAX/VMS V5.{something} and then onto Alpha VMS V6.{something}.
I have not touched any Itanium systems.
Simon.
PDP-8 TSS-8
PDP-11 DOS then everything since except Ultrix.
TOPS-10 as a user, about 1975
VMS not sure which version, sometime in the early 80's on a 750
--
To de-mung my e-mail address:- fsnospam$elliott$$
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Ian Hammond
2021-03-04 12:33:11 UTC
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Post by Elliott Roper
On 3 Mar 2021 at 18:24:22 GMT, "Simon Clubley"
Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
For me, I started with a PDP-11 running RSTS/E V9.{something early},
then onto VAX/VMS V5.{something} and then onto Alpha VMS V6.{something}.
I have not touched any Itanium systems.
Simon.
PDP-8 TSS-8
PDP-11 DOS then everything since except Ultrix.
TOPS-10 as a user, about 1975
VMS not sure which version, sometime in the early 80's on a 750
--
To de-mung my e-mail address:- fsnospam$elliott$$
PGP Fingerprint: 1A96 3CF7 637F 896B C810 E199 7E5C A9E4 8E59 E248
The PDP-11/20 I worked on might have the been the first to be delivered
to Australia; it was ordered well in advance of the system's release. The
sales brochures in fact described a different instruction set (the heavily
bit-encoded architecture).

The PDP-11/20 had 8kw core memory (I think it was 8kw, but it might
have been 12 or 16), an ASR-33 teletype with paper tape punch and reader
and DECtapes. PTS, the papertape system, was the first I used. Most of my
time was spent using the switch panel to debug and write binary code.
The great thing about core memory was that it retained its contents even
when the system was switched off. I wrote a nano-operating system and
patched IOX (the I/O package) and PTS BASIC so that we could use the
DECtapes. The PTS system reserved the top 14 words of memory for
a (self-modifying) paper tape bootstrap loader. Some how I managed to
squeeze a DECtape bootstrap into that space.

We then purchased two operating systems at the same time: RT-11
V1.0 and DOSbatch. I booted RT-11 and never got around to looking at
the other system (because it needed a SYSGEN, I think). I used every
version of RT-11, up until V5.5.

One of the delivered system DECtapes must have been previously used
internally because I found source code past the last file on the tape.

We later doubled the memory bank. At the time I couldn't conceive how
I could possibly use that seemingly vast new area of additional memory.

My first VAX was a 730 (which we thought of as "almost a VAX"). We
used it largely as transparent file server and a product development
machine.
Simon Clubley
2021-03-04 13:18:37 UTC
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Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
For me, I started with a PDP-11 running RSTS/E V9.{something early},
then onto VAX/VMS V5.{something} and then onto Alpha VMS V6.{something}.
I have not touched any Itanium systems.
Thank you to everyone for your replies.

When Elliot mentioned how he got started in the DEC world, I was
curious how everyone else got started as well.

There certainly was more variety back then. I never touched a DEC
system until my first permanent job, but before then I had already
used a Honeywell mainframe and a Sperry (originally Univac) miniframe
as a secondary school student (early 1980s) and a MPE machine in a
summer job.

Thanks once again everyone.

Simon.
--
Simon Clubley, ***@remove_me.eisner.decus.org-Earth.UFP
Walking destinations on a map are further away than they appear.
Marc Van Dyck
2021-03-04 16:50:47 UTC
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Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
For me, I started with a PDP-11 running RSTS/E V9.{something early},
then onto VAX/VMS V5.{something} and then onto Alpha VMS V6.{something}.
I have not touched any Itanium systems.
Simon.
University, 1980. VAX/VMS V2.0 on a VAX 780.
2,5 GB of memory, 3 disks of 72 MB each, a tape drive, and 40 serial
lines hooked to VT100 or LA120 (for APL, we were FT site) terminals.
Ah yes, and two LPxxx printers and a card reader.
Never left VMS after that, till now...
--
Marc Van Dyck
Phillip Helbig (undress to reply)
2021-03-04 17:19:04 UTC
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Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
Late-comer. I started with VMS 5.5mumble at the Hamburg Observatory
when working on my master's thesis in (astro)physics there. There was a
cluster of two VAXstation 3100/76 and a VAXstation 2000. There was also
another VAX which was not part of the cluster and was dedicated to the
astrometry group; they had a 1-GB disk which was huge at the time (early
1990s). The two 76 had 32 and 24, or maybe 24 and 16 MB of memory.
Several people used to do image processing on them. I used them mainly
for Fortran and LaTeX, but also for email and running a webserver (which
is why my main webserver still runs on port 8000 today!). There was one
colour and one b/w graphics terminal attached, but most people connected
from terminals via a terminal server. Not DEC terminals, but similar,
GraphOn, Tektronix, Falco, etc. Some could do sixel graphics and so on.

While this was long before there was a PC, much less internet, in most
homes, I was still somewhat unusual as a physics student with neither a
PC nor much interest in one. (This was when standard PCs had 1--4 MB of
RAM; there was one at the Observatory with 8 which was huge at the
time.) Apart from some Basic on an HP calculator in the late 1970s or
early 1980s, I had no computing experience (but a general interest in
them, along with other scientific stuff). Even when choosing my thesis
topic I chose one where it was at least not clear whether I would have
to do any programming. As it turned out, I did, and was pleasantly
surprised that I liked it. My de-factor advisor urged me to learn
Fortran and LaTeX before staring so that I wouldn't waste time should I
need them later (I was already pretty sure that I would write the thesis
in LaTeX). I was still living with a former girlfriend who was studying
surveying and hence knew Fortran; she arranged for me to be able to use
some computers at her school, which had both Fortran and LaTeX. Some
sort of HP Apollo running some sort of unix. At the Observatory, they
had some new RS/6000 (most bang for the buck at the time for
workstation-type machines), but most people, especially those I was
working with, were on the VAXes. I immediately felt a closer kinship
than to unix, and had a complete Gray Wall just ouside my office.

When I started working at Jodrell Bank in 1977, they were just moving
away from VMS for personal use (though it was still doing pulsar-data
processing and telescope control, and still was years later, perhaps
even today), so I took out a loan and bought a new 255/233 with 64 MB
RAM, a 1-GB and a 2-GB disk, and a nice monitor. I'm still using the
monitor today. 64 MB wouldn't be enough RAM today, the 21064A (EV45) a
bit slow, but in any case it died due probably to a failed capacitor on
the motherboard. Around this time, one could pick up VAXstations and
similar for free or for a token payments, so I soon built a three-node
cluster by adding two VAXen.

Someone lent me an InfoServer in return for letting him have an account.
It had a 4-GB disk in it (huge at the time), partitioned into 4 1-GB
disks. He was using only part of at most two of those. When I needed
more disk space, I---get a load of this---set up a volume set consisting
of two of the 1-GB partitions! I gradually accumulated more VAXen and
disks and tape drives and storage boxes. I had no HBVS and made backups
of everything at least daily. A couple of years later I moved to the
Kapteyn Institute in Groning and took most of the stuff with me, but
kept a VAXstation at Jodrell Bank for when I came back to visit.

At the end of 2000, I took up a VMS job at the stock exchange in
Frankfurt. They were Alpha then, the VAXen having gone at the end of
the 1990s (though there were a few still around), and moved to Itanium a
few years later. Lots of Rdb. I set up my own stuff at home, in the
early days with an internet connection via ISDN. I soon set up HBVS for
all disks, and use double-height SEAGATE 9-GB disks for a long time. I
switched off the VAXen in 2011, having accumulated enough ALPHAs
(including spares), and not long after moved completely to SBB disks in
Top-Gun Blue BA356 boxes. Never had Itanium at home. A big project for
this year (I am now in voluntary early retirement from the stock
exchange, which still uses VMS but is moving more and more to linux,
cloud, ansible, docker, openshift, and all kinds of newfangled stuff) is
to get my hard- and software up to speed to make the transition to x86
as soon as possible, which I plan to do via a mixed-architecture
cluster.

I'm now running 2 PWS and an XP1000 in the main cluster and a 5305/1200
some DS10s as satellites (only one satellite booted at a time). I
probably have enough spares to last me until I die should I stick with
Alpha, but software and perhaps licenses will soon become too old so I'm
looking forward to VMS on x86. I'll probably wait until I can get it to
run on bare metal, because life is short. According to the Python
script posted here recently, it should run on a wide range of hardware,
even though perhaps not supported. It might be slow, but still faster
than the Alphas I have.
Simon Clubley
2021-03-04 19:11:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Phillip Helbig (undress to reply)
When I started working at Jodrell Bank in 1977, they were just moving
^^^^
Did you mean a couple of decades later than that ? :-)

Simon.
--
Simon Clubley, ***@remove_me.eisner.decus.org-Earth.UFP
Walking destinations on a map are further away than they appear.
Phillip Helbig (undress to reply)
2021-03-04 19:19:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Simon Clubley
Post by Phillip Helbig (undress to reply)
When I started working at Jodrell Bank in 1977, they were just moving
^^^^
Did you mean a couple of decades later than that ? :-)
Yes, 1997! No Alphas in 1977, and VAXes, I don't know, probably just
barely, and certainly nothing I could have bought from my own money!
John H. Reinhardt
2021-03-05 00:02:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Phillip Helbig (undress to reply)
Post by Simon Clubley
Post by Phillip Helbig (undress to reply)
When I started working at Jodrell Bank in 1977, they were just moving
^^^^
Did you mean a couple of decades later than that ? :-)
Yes, 1997! No Alphas in 1977, and VAXes, I don't know, probably just
barely, and certainly nothing I could have bought from my own money!
The only available VAX in 1979 was the 11/780. At roughly $200K - $250K US it's not likely you would have bought one. ;)
--
John H. Reinhardt
Dave Froble
2021-03-05 02:03:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John H. Reinhardt
Post by Phillip Helbig (undress to reply)
On 2021-03-04, Phillip Helbig (undress to reply)
Post by Phillip Helbig (undress to reply)
When I started working at Jodrell Bank in 1977, they were just moving
^^^^
Did you mean a couple of decades later than that ? :-)
Yes, 1997! No Alphas in 1977, and VAXes, I don't know, probably just
barely, and certainly nothing I could have bought from my own money!
The only available VAX in 1979 was the 11/780. At roughly $200K - $250K
US it's not likely you would have bought one. ;)
I've always been amazed that such prices could be afforded back then,
but not now ....
--
David Froble Tel: 724-529-0450
Dave Froble Enterprises, Inc. E-Mail: ***@tsoft-inc.com
DFE Ultralights, Inc.
170 Grimplin Road
Vanderbilt, PA 15486
John Dallman
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dave Froble
Post by John H. Reinhardt
The only available VAX in 1979 was the 11/780. At roughly $200K -
$250K US it's not likely you would have bought one. ;)
I've always been amazed that such prices could be afforded back
then, but not now ....
Back then, that VAX setup was all of the computing for a sizeable team,
and they needed to have a good reason to get the budget for it.

Nowadays, it comes in much smaller chunks: PCs, servers, more networking,
software likely priced on a different basis, and so on. It is probably
cheaper overall, and is standard for any and all kinds of business.

And any way of doing things that isn't close to the cheapest available,
is "unaffordable."

John
Phillip Helbig (undress to reply)
2021-03-05 10:15:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dave Froble
Post by John H. Reinhardt
The only available VAX in 1979 was the 11/780. At roughly $200K - $250K
US it's not likely you would have bought one. ;)
I've always been amazed that such prices could be afforded back then,
but not now ....
Well, back then a company of several thousand employees had one such
beach; now all employees have at least one computer. The total amount
spent on IT is probably more today, and gets VASTLY more stuff done.
Phillip Helbig (undress to reply)
2021-03-05 10:55:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Phillip Helbig (undress to reply)
Post by Dave Froble
I've always been amazed that such prices could be afforded back then,
but not now ....
Well, back then a company of several thousand employees had one such
beach; now all employees have at least one computer. The total amount
spent on IT is probably more today, and gets VASTLY more stuff done.
beach ---> beast :-)
alexey chupahin
2021-03-05 13:18:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I'm Orthodox DECer... since 198x never have x86/DOS/Windows at my homework table...

I'm started at 198x with RT-11 5.1 and Russian Fodos 3.1( clone RT-11 5.1) on DVK-3 (an personal PDP with graphics no PDP-11 direct clone) and Elektronika-85 ( Professional-350 clone)

RT-11 5.2 on Russian 2-processor UKNC (very fast small personal PDP-in-keyboard with graphics no PDP-11 direct clone)

Russian PROS 2.03 with full DCL like RSX-11M/plus ( P/OS 2.0A clone) on Elektronika-85

Russian RAFOS/NTS system RT-11 compatible (similar RT11/TSX tandem) on SM-1420 ( 11/34 clone)

VAX/VMS 3.x on SM1700 ( VAX11/730 clone)
Russian Demos-32 ( Unix variant) on SM1702 (microvax II clone)

Alphas.. since DEC2000 model 300 ...Itaniums... OpenVMS..... and Linux ... no Windows
Post by Phillip Helbig (undress to reply)
Post by Phillip Helbig (undress to reply)
Post by Dave Froble
I've always been amazed that such prices could be afforded back then,
but not now ....
Well, back then a company of several thousand employees had one such
beach; now all employees have at least one computer. The total amount
spent on IT is probably more today, and gets VASTLY more stuff done.
beach ---> beast :-)
John Dallman
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Phillip Helbig (undress to reply)
Well, back then a company of several thousand employees had one
such beast; now all employees have at least one computer.
When the product I work on started development in the mid-eighties, there
were about ten people, sharing a 4MB VAX with Cifer terminals. Only two
people could run the product at the same time, without the VAX swapping
itself into oblivion.

There were two small flags (the cloth kind, on sticks) and possession of
one allowed you to run the product. They're still in the office, even
though 4MB is less than the processor cache on the slowest platform we
support.

John
Phillip Helbig (undress to reply)
2021-03-05 10:13:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John H. Reinhardt
Post by Phillip Helbig (undress to reply)
Post by Simon Clubley
Post by Phillip Helbig (undress to reply)
When I started working at Jodrell Bank in 1977, they were just moving
^^^^
Did you mean a couple of decades later than that ? :-)
Yes, 1997! No Alphas in 1977, and VAXes, I don't know, probably just
barely, and certainly nothing I could have bought from my own money!
The only available VAX in 1979 was the 11/780. At roughly $200K -
$250K US it's not likely you would have bought one. ;)
Interestingly, while working at Jodrell Bank and collecting DEC gear,
once I went to pick up some terminals and the guy said that he had some
other stuff and could I take it all, giving away what I didn't need. I
said OK, and was surprised that one of the things was an 11/780, which I
just managed to get in my car. But within 24 hours I had about a dozen
people interested in having it. It went into a barn where it was
dwarfed by the rest of the huge hardware collection. :-)
Marc Van Dyck
2021-03-05 17:02:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Phillip Helbig (undress to reply)
Post by John H. Reinhardt
Post by Phillip Helbig (undress to reply)
Post by Simon Clubley
Post by Phillip Helbig (undress to reply)
When I started working at Jodrell Bank in 1977, they were just moving
^^^^
Did you mean a couple of decades later than that ? :-)
Yes, 1997! No Alphas in 1977, and VAXes, I don't know, probably just
barely, and certainly nothing I could have bought from my own money!
The only available VAX in 1979 was the 11/780. At roughly $200K -
$250K US it's not likely you would have bought one. ;)
Interestingly, while working at Jodrell Bank and collecting DEC gear,
once I went to pick up some terminals and the guy said that he had some
other stuff and could I take it all, giving away what I didn't need. I
said OK, and was surprised that one of the things was an 11/780, which I
just managed to get in my car. But within 24 hours I had about a dozen
people interested in having it. It went into a barn where it was
dwarfed by the rest of the huge hardware collection. :-)
A VAX 780 in a car ??? What car was that ? The one I worked with was
made of 4 cabinets each having the size of a large refrigerator...
--
Marc Van Dyck
Phillip Helbig (undress to reply)
2021-03-05 17:10:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Marc Van Dyck
A VAX 780 in a car ??? What car was that ? The one I worked with was
made of 4 cabinets each having the size of a large refrigerator...
Just one cabinet, but refrigerator size is correct. I moved the front
seats all the way up and folded down the back seat in an estate car.
abrsvc
2021-03-05 20:00:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Marc Van Dyck
A VAX 780 in a car ??? What car was that ? The one I worked with was
made of 4 cabinets each having the size of a large refrigerator...
Just one cabinet, but refrigerator size is correct. I moved the front
seats all the way up and folded down the back seat in an estate car.
Really?? The main 11/780 cab was a double wide cabinet. I don't think it would fit into any car. I can dig up the specs as I'm sure I still have them around to get the exact size, but... The expansion cabs were the size of refrigerators and most setups had at least 1.
Phillip Helbig (undress to reply)
2021-03-05 20:02:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Friday, 5 March 2021 at 12:11:03 UTC-5, Phillip Helbig (undress to reply=
Post by Marc Van Dyck
A VAX 780 in a car ??? What car was that ? The one I worked with was
made of 4 cabinets each having the size of a large refrigerator...
Just one cabinet, but refrigerator size is correct. I moved the front
seats all the way up and folded down the back seat in an estate car.
Really?? The main 11/780 cab was a double wide cabinet. I don't think it =
would fit into any car. I can dig up the specs as I'm sure I still have th=
em around to get the exact size, but... The expansion cabs were the size o=
f refrigerators and most setups had at least 1.
As I wasn't interested in keeping it I didn't investigate it further.
Perhaps it was some sort of PDP.
Marc Van Dyck
2021-03-07 17:28:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by abrsvc
Post by Marc Van Dyck
A VAX 780 in a car ??? What car was that ? The one I worked with was
made of 4 cabinets each having the size of a large refrigerator...
Just one cabinet, but refrigerator size is correct. I moved the front
seats all the way up and folded down the back seat in an estate car.
Really?? The main 11/780 cab was a double wide cabinet. I don't think it
would fit into any car. I can dig up the specs as I'm sure I still have them
around to get the exact size, but... The expansion cabs were the size of
refrigerators and most setups had at least 1.
If I remember well, ours was made of 4 cabinets in total. One double
for the CPU, one for MassBus, and one for Unibus and péripherals
--
Marc Van Dyck
Simon Clubley
2021-03-07 17:46:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Marc Van Dyck
If I remember well, ours was made of 4 cabinets in total. One double
for the CPU, one for MassBus, and one for Unibus and péripherals
And these days, you can emulate it on a computer you can hold in
one hand, or even between your fingers. :-)

Simon.
--
Simon Clubley, ***@remove_me.eisner.decus.org-Earth.UFP
Walking destinations on a map are further away than they appear.
Chris Townley
2021-03-07 18:06:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Simon Clubley
Post by Marc Van Dyck
If I remember well, ours was made of 4 cabinets in total. One double
for the CPU, one for MassBus, and one for Unibus and péripherals
And these days, you can emulate it on a computer you can hold in
one hand, or even between your fingers. :-)
Simon.
That sounds like too many design tools - the back of a fag packet ;)

Chris
Chris Townley
2021-03-04 17:20:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Marc Van Dyck
Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
For me, I started with a PDP-11 running RSTS/E V9.{something early},
then onto VAX/VMS V5.{something} and then onto Alpha VMS V6.{something}.
I have not touched any Itanium systems.
Simon.
University, 1980. VAX/VMS V2.0 on a VAX 780.
2,5 GB of memory, 3 disks of 72 MB each, a tape drive, and 40 serial
lines hooked to VT100 or LA120 (for APL, we were FT site) terminals.
Ah yes, and two LPxxx printers and a card reader.
Never left VMS after that, till now...
That was a vast amount of memory then!

We ran a full production setup with 80 odd users in 1990 with 32Mb

Chris
Arne Vajhøj
2021-03-04 18:28:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris Townley
Post by Marc Van Dyck
Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
University, 1980. VAX/VMS V2.0 on a VAX 780.
2,5 GB of memory, 3 disks of 72 MB each, a tape drive, and 40 serial
lines hooked to VT100 or LA120 (for APL, we were FT site) terminals.
Ah yes, and two LPxxx printers and a card reader.
Never left VMS after that, till now...
That was a vast amount of memory then!
We ran a full production setup with 80 odd users in 1990 with 32Mb
I strongly suspect that it was a typo.

I don't think you could stuff 2.5 GB in a 780 and at 1980 RAM prices
it would be crazy expensive.

Arne
Jeffrey H. Coffield
2021-03-04 18:40:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Arne Vajhøj
Post by Chris Townley
Post by Marc Van Dyck
Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
University, 1980. VAX/VMS V2.0 on a VAX 780.
2,5 GB of memory, 3 disks of 72 MB each, a tape drive, and 40 serial
lines hooked to VT100 or LA120 (for APL, we were FT site) terminals.
Ah yes, and two LPxxx printers and a card reader.
Never left VMS after that, till now...
That was a vast amount of memory then!
We ran a full production setup with 80 odd users in 1990 with 32Mb
I strongly suspect that it was a typo.
I don't think you could stuff 2.5 GB in a 780 and at 1980 RAM prices
it would be crazy expensive.
Arne
Vax 11/780 max memory was 64MB.

Jeff
Paul Hardy
2021-03-04 19:05:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jeffrey H. Coffield
Post by Arne Vajhøj
Post by Chris Townley
Post by Marc Van Dyck
Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
University, 1980. VAX/VMS V2.0 on a VAX 780.
2,5 GB of memory, 3 disks of 72 MB each, a tape drive, and 40 serial
lines hooked to VT100 or LA120 (for APL, we were FT site) terminals.
Ah yes, and two LPxxx printers and a card reader.
Never left VMS after that, till now...
That was a vast amount of memory then!
We ran a full production setup with 80 odd users in 1990 with 32Mb
I strongly suspect that it was a typo.
I don't think you could stuff 2.5 GB in a 780 and at 1980 RAM prices
it would be crazy expensive.
Arne
Vax 11/780 max memory was 64MB.
Jeff
The default for a 780 when launched was 1/4 MB (256K). When we got ours in
1979 I argued and got a further 1/2 MB to make 3/4 MB. It cost about a
quarter of the company profit for the year! The boss said that as we were
moving from a PDP-11 with 64KB, then 256 KB ought to be plenty!

Remember the V in VMS is virtual, and VMS pages were only 1/2 KB, so if you
had 1 MB you had 2048 pages to act as a memory window to the disk-based
page and swap areas.
--
Paul at the paulhardy.net domain
Bob Eager
2021-03-05 00:10:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Paul Hardy
Post by Jeffrey H. Coffield
Post by Arne Vajhøj
Post by Chris Townley
Post by Marc Van Dyck
Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
University, 1980. VAX/VMS V2.0 on a VAX 780.
2,5 GB of memory, 3 disks of 72 MB each, a tape drive, and 40 serial
lines hooked to VT100 or LA120 (for APL, we were FT site) terminals.
Ah yes, and two LPxxx printers and a card reader.
Never left VMS after that, till now...
That was a vast amount of memory then!
We ran a full production setup with 80 odd users in 1990 with 32Mb
I strongly suspect that it was a typo.
I don't think you could stuff 2.5 GB in a 780 and at 1980 RAM prices
it would be crazy expensive.
Arne
Vax 11/780 max memory was 64MB.
Jeff
The default for a 780 when launched was 1/4 MB (256K). When we got ours
in 1979 I argued and got a further 1/2 MB to make 3/4 MB. It cost about
a quarter of the company profit for the year! The boss said that as we
were moving from a PDP-11 with 64KB, then 256 KB ought to be plenty!
Remember the V in VMS is virtual, and VMS pages were only 1/2 KB, so if
you had 1 MB you had 2048 pages to act as a memory window to the
disk-based page and swap areas.
Less 8kB (16 pages) for the page tables. And a few more! :)
--
My posts are my copyright and if @diy_forums or Home Owners' Hub
wish to copy them they can pay me £1 a message.
Use the BIG mirror service in the UK: http://www.mirrorservice.org
*lightning surge protection* - a w_tom conductor
Marc Van Dyck
2021-03-05 16:52:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Arne Vajhøj
Post by Chris Townley
Post by Marc Van Dyck
Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
University, 1980. VAX/VMS V2.0 on a VAX 780.
2,5 GB of memory, 3 disks of 72 MB each, a tape drive, and 40 serial
lines hooked to VT100 or LA120 (for APL, we were FT site) terminals.
Ah yes, and two LPxxx printers and a card reader.
Never left VMS after that, till now...
That was a vast amount of memory then!
We ran a full production setup with 80 odd users in 1990 with 32Mb
I strongly suspect that it was a typo.
I don't think you could stuff 2.5 GB in a 780 and at 1980 RAM prices
it would be crazy expensive.
Arne
Oooopsss... 2.5 MB, not GB, indeed. Sorry.
--
Marc Van Dyck
Marc Van Dyck
2021-03-05 16:56:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Marc Van Dyck
Post by Arne Vajhøj
Post by Chris Townley
Post by Marc Van Dyck
Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
University, 1980. VAX/VMS V2.0 on a VAX 780.
2,5 GB of memory, 3 disks of 72 MB each, a tape drive, and 40 serial
lines hooked to VT100 or LA120 (for APL, we were FT site) terminals.
Ah yes, and two LPxxx printers and a card reader.
Never left VMS after that, till now...
That was a vast amount of memory then!
We ran a full production setup with 80 odd users in 1990 with 32Mb
I strongly suspect that it was a typo.
I don't think you could stuff 2.5 GB in a 780 and at 1980 RAM prices
it would be crazy expensive.
Arne
Oooopsss... 2.5 MB, not GB, indeed. Sorry.
Even those 2.5 MB were crazy expensive, so we had 1.5 MB of original
DEC memory and the additional MB came from an alternate supplier.
--
Marc Van Dyck
Bill Gunshannon
2021-03-04 19:42:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris Townley
Post by Marc Van Dyck
Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
For me, I started with a PDP-11 running RSTS/E V9.{something early},
then onto VAX/VMS V5.{something} and then onto Alpha VMS V6.{something}.
I have not touched any Itanium systems.
Simon.
University, 1980. VAX/VMS V2.0 on a VAX 780.
2,5 GB of memory, 3 disks of 72 MB each, a tape drive, and 40 serial
lines hooked to VT100 or LA120 (for APL, we were FT site) terminals.
Ah yes, and two LPxxx printers and a card reader.
Never left VMS after that, till now...
That was a vast amount of memory then!
We ran a full production setup with 80 odd users in 1990 with 32Mb
I would really like to see the VAX 11/780 with 2.8 GB of memory.

"The VAX-11/780 originally supported up to 8MB of memory through
one or two MS780-C memory controllers, with each controller
supporting between 128kB-4MB of memory. The later MS780-E memory
controller supported 4MB-64MB of memory, allowing the VAX-11/780
to support up to a total of 128MB of memory.[4] The KA780 has a
29-bit physical address space, allowing it to address a theoretical
maximum of 512MB of memory."
--
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VAX-11#VAX-11/780


bill
Marc Van Dyck
2021-03-05 16:58:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bill Gunshannon
Post by Chris Townley
Post by Marc Van Dyck
Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
For me, I started with a PDP-11 running RSTS/E V9.{something early},
then onto VAX/VMS V5.{something} and then onto Alpha VMS V6.{something}.
I have not touched any Itanium systems.
Simon.
University, 1980. VAX/VMS V2.0 on a VAX 780.
2,5 GB of memory, 3 disks of 72 MB each, a tape drive, and 40 serial
lines hooked to VT100 or LA120 (for APL, we were FT site) terminals.
Ah yes, and two LPxxx printers and a card reader.
Never left VMS after that, till now...
That was a vast amount of memory then!
We ran a full production setup with 80 odd users in 1990 with 32Mb
I would really like to see the VAX 11/780 with 2.8 GB of memory.
Was MB, not GB, sorry.
Post by Bill Gunshannon
"The VAX-11/780 originally supported up to 8MB of memory through
one or two MS780-C memory controllers, with each controller
supporting between 128kB-4MB of memory. The later MS780-E memory
controller supported 4MB-64MB of memory, allowing the VAX-11/780
to support up to a total of 128MB of memory.[4] The KA780 has a
29-bit physical address space, allowing it to address a theoretical
maximum of 512MB of memory."
--
Marc Van Dyck
Bruce Bowler
2021-03-04 18:23:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
For me, I started with a PDP-11 running RSTS/E V9.{something early},
then onto VAX/VMS V5.{something} and then onto Alpha VMS V6.{something}.
I have not touched any Itanium systems.
Simon.
PDP-8 with a P(aper)T(ape)OS
Alfred Falk
2021-03-04 23:10:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
For me, I started with a PDP-11 running RSTS/E V9.{something early},
then onto VAX/VMS V5.{something} and then onto Alpha VMS V6.{something}.
I have not touched any Itanium systems.
Simon.
Hmmm...
KM-9 on a PDP-9 in 1967. Not quite an OS and pretty painful (by modern
standards) DECtape-based system. All the software we developed was for bare
metal - a data collection system in a nuclear lab. (CPU s/n KA9-17.)

TOPS-10 in 1970-74. Strictly as a user of timesharing system. Loved it.
(CPU s/n KA10-13 or -14.)

Some contact with RSX-15 in 1974.

A little work with another PDP-9 in 1975. Disk-based this time.

PDP-11/40 running UNIX 1974-77. Strictly as user. (Not a DEC OS, so I guess
it doesn't count.)

RSX-11, various hardware 1977-1990.

RT-11 198?-87

Brush with RSTS ca. 1979

VMS many versions from about 1979 through reirement in 2015.
John E. Malmberg
2021-03-06 01:18:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
PDP-10, I think the monitor reported a version 5.0.3
Then later a TOPS-10 system that I remember running 7.0.3 or something
similar.

After that an RT-11 system, VAX-11/750 and then more VAXen and
MicroVAXen than worth counting.

And in spite of it not being supported, a Microvax II with 8 VaxStation
2000 satelites worked quite well as a cluster once you figured out the
right sysgen parameters.

Currently have one 2 VAXen running in emulation, one is an
infoserver-pi. 2 Alpha DS-10s, And an Itanium system.

Had a VT-180, never powered it up and gave it away.

Have actually used a GIGI, and VXT terminals.

Have 3 VAXen and several Multia's powered off at the moment.
One chassis can be a MV-II or MicroVAX-I depending on which board set I
install.

Regards,
-John
Galen
2021-03-06 04:39:18 UTC
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Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
Cal State Hayward, 1976-1980. RSTS/E V5 originally, PDP-11/45 with RP04,
96K RAM. Subsequently upgraded to 128K, V6 and V7, worked a lot with RT-11
and RSX-11 RTS’s. Also bare-metal LSI-11 with ASR33, paper tape.

Lockheed Missiles & Space Co., 1980, RSX-11M v3.1, PDP-11/45, 256 KB, 4x
RK05, Tektronix 4010 and 4014 scopes, also RT-11 on PDP-11/34 with 2x RX01;
PDP-11/60, 256 KB, RSX-11M; 1981? VMS V2? VAX-11/780,

1981-2008, Lots of other PDP-11, inc. 11/84, Pro 300 series. Multiple
VAX/MicroVAX/VAXstation models including 3100, 8650, 6000, Became lead VMS
sysmgr about 1985, continued with VMS on multiple Alphas: 3100, 10000,
DS10, DS25, thru ES47. Integrity rx2600 and rx1610. A smattering of Ultrix
and OSF.

C. 2008, Hobbyist DS10 and SIMH.
Rich Alderson
2021-03-07 23:31:09 UTC
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Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
For me, I started with a PDP-11 running RSTS/E V9.{something early},
then onto VAX/VMS V5.{something} and then onto Alpha VMS V6.{something}.
I have not touched any Itanium systems.
Well, I started my DEC career on TOPS-20 v3A in 1977.

I played a bit with RT-11 on a lab system in 1978 (speech synthesis class in my
Ph.D program). Don't know the version, whatever was current at the time.

After starting to build the museum in 2003, I played with TSS/8, OS/8,
DECSYS-7, Tops-10 v6.03A, RSX-15 and ADSS-15, VMS 6.2, and IAS.
--
Rich Alderson ***@alderson.users.panix.com
Audendum est, et veritas investiganda; quam etiamsi non assequamur,
omnino tamen proprius, quam nunc sumus, ad eam perveniemus.
--Galen
Carl Friedberg
2021-03-08 14:04:17 UTC
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I was a physics undergraduate and allowed to play with a PDP1 (at the
physics department). I created an interface so data could be collected
online using an interrupt driven interface, replacing a paper tape punch I
had already built so the physics data could be collected, and then read on
the PDP1 paper tape reader. If I recall, the DEC system boards were too
expensive. I went to the Mill, they showed me their wave soldering machine
(among other jewels) and showed me how to order and assemble my own boards.
That way, I could create the exact computer logic I needed. I had those
boards manufactured, and they worked.

On Sun, Mar 7, 2021 at 6:50 PM Rich Alderson via Info-vax <
Post by Rich Alderson
Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
For me, I started with a PDP-11 running RSTS/E V9.{something early},
then onto VAX/VMS V5.{something} and then onto Alpha VMS V6.{something}.
I have not touched any Itanium systems.
Well, I started my DEC career on TOPS-20 v3A in 1977.
I played a bit with RT-11 on a lab system in 1978 (speech synthesis class in my
Ph.D program). Don't know the version, whatever was current at the time.
After starting to build the museum in 2003, I played with TSS/8, OS/8,
DECSYS-7, Tops-10 v6.03A, RSX-15 and ADSS-15, VMS 6.2, and IAS.
--
Rich Alderson
Audendum est, et veritas investiganda; quam etiamsi non assequamur,
omnino tamen proprius, quam nunc sumus, ad eam perveniemus.
--Galen
_______________________________________________
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http://rbnsn.com/mailman/listinfo/info-vax_rbnsn.com
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Fred. Zwarts
2021-03-08 14:23:51 UTC
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Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
For me, I started with a PDP-11 running RSTS/E V9.{something early},
then onto VAX/VMS V5.{something} and then onto Alpha VMS V6.{something}.
I have not touched any Itanium systems.
Simon.
1978 PDP15. Paper tape and block-addressable DECtapes (magtape).
Booting the system was a nice exercise.
I still have a piece of core-memory. The bits are visible with the naked
eye.

1980 VAX 11-780 with VMS 1.5.
Hein RMS van den Heuvel
2021-03-08 15:01:05 UTC
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Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
For me, I started with a PDP-11 running RSTS/E V9.{something early},
1978 - RSX-11M installations, mostly on PDP11/34's - Version 3.1 comes to mind?
Made one (DR11 - parallel digital?) device driver for RSTS/E (V9?) for which I had to learn a bit of Teco as that was the bootloader of sorts or something like that.
Soon focused on RMS-11 and commercial languages as we called them: Basic-plus-2, Cobol and VAX Macro of course.
I spend a lot of time with TKB - the overlaying task builder - finessing ODL files :-)
1983 - Transition to VAX/VMS - I met some early versions but I seem to recall version 3.7 was our workhorse version.
1991 - VMS Engineering Vax V5.5-2 Amber release first, Helping with ports to Alpha for 6.0 (Blade?) soon after.

Hein
Simon Clubley
2021-03-08 18:25:10 UTC
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Post by Hein RMS van den Heuvel
I spend a lot of time with TKB - the overlaying task builder - finessing ODL files :-)
I _had_ managed to purge working with TKB from my memory. :-)

On a more serious note, thanks to everyone for your continued comments and
it's interesting to see everyone's varied history within the DEC world.

Also on a more serious note, TKB was actually a good example of a capability
that allowed you to build a large application within a very small address
space. I'm just glad we don't have to do _that_ any more. :-)

Simon.
--
Simon Clubley, ***@remove_me.eisner.decus.org-Earth.UFP
Walking destinations on a map are further away than they appear.
Oswald Knoppers
2021-03-09 12:42:29 UTC
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Post by Simon Clubley
Post by Hein RMS van den Heuvel
I spend a lot of time with TKB - the overlaying task builder - finessing ODL files :-)
I _had_ managed to purge working with TKB from my memory. :-)
I still run RSX11M+ on my PiDP11/70 (https://obsolescence.wixsite.com/obsolescence/pidp-11).

This RSX version (V4.6) however also has DCL. So you can use the link command for using the task builder.

Oswald
Simon Clubley
2021-03-09 13:08:09 UTC
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Post by Oswald Knoppers
Post by Simon Clubley
Post by Hein RMS van den Heuvel
I spend a lot of time with TKB - the overlaying task builder - finessing ODL files :-)
I _had_ managed to purge working with TKB from my memory. :-)
I still run RSX11M+ on my PiDP11/70 (https://obsolescence.wixsite.com/obsolescence/pidp-11).
This RSX version (V4.6) however also has DCL. So you can use the link command for using the task builder.
Using TKB itself wasn't the fun bit. :-)

Using it to build overlaid applications, and writing those overlaid
applications in the first place, was the "fun" bit.

(For various values of "fun". :-))

Simon.
--
Simon Clubley, ***@remove_me.eisner.decus.org-Earth.UFP
Walking destinations on a map are further away than they appear.
Paul Hardy
2021-03-09 14:47:37 UTC
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Post by Simon Clubley
I _had_ managed to purge working with TKB from my memory. :-)
Aargh. You just brought back horrible memories of a wasted week trying to
debug a crash on PDP-11 in an application that had a complex TKB overlay
tree. Eventually traced to cross-calling between branches - worked fine for
the called routine, but when it tried to return to the caller, it had been
trampled on by loading the called routine over the top. You must only call
down to branches, not across.

It was a real relief to move to VAX and lay the application flat!
--
Paul at the paulhardy.net domain
Simon Clubley
2021-03-09 19:01:58 UTC
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Post by Paul Hardy
Post by Simon Clubley
I _had_ managed to purge working with TKB from my memory. :-)
Aargh. You just brought back horrible memories of a wasted week trying to
debug a crash on PDP-11 in an application that had a complex TKB overlay
tree. Eventually traced to cross-calling between branches - worked fine for
the called routine, but when it tried to return to the caller, it had been
trampled on by loading the called routine over the top. You must only call
down to branches, not across.
It was a real relief to move to VAX and lay the application flat!
Sorry. :-)

TKB overlays were a solution to the limited memory sizes of those days,
but I am _really_ glad we don't have to do anything like that any more. :-)

Simon.
--
Simon Clubley, ***@remove_me.eisner.decus.org-Earth.UFP
Walking destinations on a map are further away than they appear.
Jonathan
2021-03-08 23:22:06 UTC
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1971 - TSS8
1975 - RT11
1976 - RSTS
1977 - RSX-11, TOPS-10
1979 - VMS
1983 - TOPS-20
Clark G
2021-03-11 01:48:39 UTC
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Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
Simon.
My first taste of DEC gear was some PDP-11 running RT-11 I got to play with
a bit on a summer job right after graduating in 1983.
Shortly after starting at my first job at Nortel, I bacame the system admin
for the department's VAX 11/730 running VMS 3.0. VMS was never upgraded on
it, and it now sits in my basement waiting for me to get it running again
one day. I have the orange wall packed away in my crawl space.
--
Clark G
* take away the em's to reply
Jerry Eckert
2021-03-11 17:30:48 UTC
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Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
RSTS-11 (N.B. not /E) V4A on a PDP-11/20 in 1972. The system was upgraded to a PDP-11/50 running RSTS/E V5A within a year.

My first VMS system was a VAX-11/780 running V1
Dave Froble
2021-03-11 21:23:00 UTC
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Post by Jerry Eckert
Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
RSTS-11 (N.B. not /E) V4A on a PDP-11/20 in 1972. The system was upgraded to a PDP-11/50 running RSTS/E V5A within a year.
My first VMS system was a VAX-11/780 running V1
That's a year before I started with RSTS/E V04b.

I'm wondering how today's programmers would do with the variable names
Basic+ allowed back then? A single letter, or, a single letter followed
by a single decimal. "%" suffix to denote an integer, "$" suffix to
denote a string.

Even more fun was writing and toggling in a bootstrap loader for the
PDP6, but that wasn't work, that was school.
--
David Froble Tel: 724-529-0450
Dave Froble Enterprises, Inc. E-Mail: ***@tsoft-inc.com
DFE Ultralights, Inc.
170 Grimplin Road
Vanderbilt, PA 15486
Bill Gunshannon
2021-03-11 23:21:18 UTC
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Post by Dave Froble
Post by Jerry Eckert
Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
RSTS-11 (N.B. not /E) V4A on a PDP-11/20 in 1972. The system was
upgraded to a PDP-11/50 running RSTS/E V5A within a year.
My first VMS system was a VAX-11/780 running V1
That's a year before I started with RSTS/E V04b.
I'm wondering how today's programmers would do with the variable names
Basic+ allowed back then?  A single letter, or, a single letter followed
by a single decimal.  "%" suffix to denote an integer, "$" suffix to
denote a string.
You should see what programmers writing ANSI-M (alias MUMPS) do!!
Post by Dave Froble
Even more fun was writing and toggling in a bootstrap loader for the
PDP6, but that wasn't work, that was school.
bill
dthi...@gmail.com
2021-03-12 03:18:19 UTC
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College:
Fall 1979: PDP-11/45 with RSTS/E 6C
Fall 1980: VAX-11/780 with VMS 2.0; later upgraded to a VAX-11/782 and VMS 3.0

David
Mark Redding
2021-04-30 15:27:55 UTC
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Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
For me, I started with a PDP-11 running RSTS/E V9.{something early},
then onto VAX/VMS V5.{something} and then onto Alpha VMS V6.{something}.
I have not touched any Itanium systems.
Simon.
--
VMS 3.7 on a couple of VAX11/780's - one for Software engineering and the other for Hardware engineering. We had a full set of manuals and the microfiche available to us.
Upgraded to VMS 4.0 some time after I joined.

Mark
Joe Glutz
2021-05-12 20:34:54 UTC
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Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
For me, I started with a PDP-11 running RSTS/E V9.{something early},
then onto VAX/VMS V5.{something} and then onto Alpha VMS V6.{something}.
I have not touched any Itanium systems.
Simon.
--
Walking destinations on a map are further away than they appear.
1973 - 1977 - RSTS V4a-12
Late 70's and early 80'a - TOPS10/TOPS20 - V3.7-V4.1
Mid to late 80s - VMS Clusters V4.1-4.7
Now in emulation - TOPS20/V7.0, RSTS/10.1, VMS 4.7 and OPENVMS 7.3
k***@gmail.com
2021-05-13 00:06:12 UTC
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Post by Timothy Stark
-----Original Message-----
Info-vax
Sent: May-12-21 5:35 PM
Subject: Re: [Info-vax] What are the earliest DEC operating systems you
worked with ?
Post by Simon Clubley
What are the earliest DEC operating systems you worked with ?
For me, I started with a PDP-11 running RSTS/E V9.{something early},
then onto VAX/VMS V5.{something} and then onto Alpha VMS
V6.{something}.
Post by Simon Clubley
I have not touched any Itanium systems.
Simon.
--
Started with DEC Field Service in '78 working on PDP8 systems and peripherals (TU56, paper tape, RK05's, LP05 printers, LA36 consoles, ASR-33 consoles).

Fond memory installing one of the first DF32's (one of early rotating fixed head disks) in local area with a colleague at a Govt research site on a PDP8I (or 8E?) with 8K (yes, K) core memory. I remember us joking "who would ever need 32K additional memory / storage?".

Got into OS/8 quite a bit on other PDP8/*'s for troubleshooting reasons.
Post by Timothy Stark
From there, progressed to supporting PDP11/* systems, then VAX 11/* systems, then X86/* systems.
From a technology perspective, the only constant is change.
😊


Regards,

Kerry Main
Kerry dot main at starkgaming dot com
--
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