Discussion:
Off-topic: NASDAQ
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Arne Vajhøj
2021-05-07 20:20:10 UTC
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Is NASDAQ still using NonStop?

Their IT got in the news today:

https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/news/warren-buffett-broke-nasdaq-system-is-unable-to-record-high-berkshire-hathaway-share-price/ar-BB1gqX4w

Arne
abrsvc
2021-05-08 01:07:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arne Vajhøj
Is NASDAQ still using NonStop?
https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/news/warren-buffett-broke-nasdaq-system-is-unable-to-record-high-berkshire-hathaway-share-price/ar-BB1gqX4w
Arne
That article doesn't make sense unless the value is stored as the number of 1000ths of cents per share as an integer value. In this case, the actual value would be displayed inserting the decimal point in the proper place. This is one of the reasons that Cobol is still used in finance because of packed decimal where there is really no limit to the number of digits.
Arne Vajhøj
2021-05-08 01:45:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by abrsvc
Post by Arne Vajhøj
Is NASDAQ still using NonStop?
https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/news/warren-buffett-broke-nasdaq-system-is-unable-to-record-high-berkshire-hathaway-share-price/ar-BB1gqX4w
That article doesn't make sense unless the value is stored as the
number of 1000ths of cents per share as an integer value. In this
case, the actual value would be displayed inserting the decimal point
in the proper place. This is one of the reasons that Cobol is still
used in finance because of packed decimal where there is really no
limit to the number of digits.
That is what they say in the article.

<quote>
This is explained because its algorithm saves stock prices as a 32-bit
number, which takes up less memory and makes the software more efficient.

In this format, the highest possible number is 2 ^ 32 -1, or
4,294,967,295, according to Gizmondo . But since Nasdaq records prices
to four decimal places, the largest figure it can store is the one quoted.
</quote>

There are plenty of solutions. Even a 64 bit integer would have done it.

Arne

PS: I don't think Cobol BCD size is unlimited - just more than big
enough for this case.
Arne Vajhøj
2021-05-08 01:48:45 UTC
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Post by Arne Vajhøj
PS: I don't think Cobol BCD size is unlimited - just more than big
    enough for this case.
31 digits (16 bytes) on VMS ??

Arne
John Reagan
2021-05-08 03:18:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arne Vajhøj
Post by Arne Vajhøj
PS: I don't think Cobol BCD size is unlimited - just more than big
enough for this case.
31 digits (16 bytes) on VMS ??
Arne
Yes.
Hans Bachner
2021-05-08 17:19:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arne Vajhøj
Post by Arne Vajhøj
Is NASDAQ still using NonStop?
https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/news/warren-buffett-broke-nasdaq-system-is-unable-to-record-high-berkshire-hathaway-share-price/ar-BB1gqX4w
[snip]
<quote>
This is explained because its algorithm saves stock prices as a 32-bit
number, which takes up less memory and makes the software more efficient.
In this format, the highest possible number is 2 ^ 32 -1, or
4,294,967,295, according to Gizmondo . But since Nasdaq records prices
to four decimal places, the largest figure it can store is the one quoted.
</quote>
There are plenty of solutions. Even a 64 bit integer would have done it.
I assume the core NASDAQ application was written before 64-bit integers
were commonly around.

Beyond that, a price of more than 400k$ per share probably was deemed
insane, as it still is today - except for a single investor.

Hans.
Michael Moroney
2021-05-08 23:21:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Hans Bachner
Beyond that, a price of more than 400k$ per share probably was deemed
insane, as it still is today - except for a single investor.
Is there a reason why that stock hasn't split to a more reasonable price
per share?

Let me guess: In order that only the super-wealthy can afford even one
share.
Chris Townley
2021-05-08 23:26:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael Moroney
Post by Hans Bachner
Beyond that, a price of more than 400k$ per share probably was deemed
insane, as it still is today - except for a single investor.
Is there a reason why that stock hasn't split to a more reasonable price
per share?
Let me guess: In order that only the super-wealthy can afford even one
share.
They do have the B shares - currently around $290 each
--
Chris Townley
Arne Vajhøj
2021-05-09 00:17:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Hans Bachner
Post by Arne Vajhøj
Post by Arne Vajhøj
Is NASDAQ still using NonStop?
https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/news/warren-buffett-broke-nasdaq-system-is-unable-to-record-high-berkshire-hathaway-share-price/ar-BB1gqX4w
<quote>
This is explained because its algorithm saves stock prices as a 32-bit
number, which takes up less memory and makes the software more efficient.
In this format, the highest possible number is 2 ^ 32 -1, or
4,294,967,295, according to Gizmondo . But since Nasdaq records prices
to four decimal places, the largest figure it can store is the one quoted.
</quote>
There are plenty of solutions. Even a 64 bit integer would have done it.
I assume the core NASDAQ application was written before 64-bit integers
were commonly around.
Maybe.

But even though 64 bit integers could be a bit tricky in the 32
bit world, then it was not impossible.

On VMS VAX then ADWC and SBWC plus some known COB$ routines
could do the basic stuff with rather few lines of code.

Of course I have no idea what was available on Tandem before
they went to 64 bit CPU's in the mid 90's.

Arne

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